Thirteen Movies I Can’t Wait to Share with Our Kids

One of the very best things about having children is sharing with them what brings you joy. It allows you to relive that same experience for the first time, perhaps even in a new way, which can be pretty magical. And if I am being honest, as a lifelong movie lover, I’m probably more excited about sharing my favorite flicks with my kiddos than watching them learn to ride a bike (which just sounds anxiety-inducing to me). In that vein, here are the top thirteen films I can’t wait to share with my kids (when they’re of age, of course).

If anything captures the spirit of childhood and the wonder of belief, it’s The Goonies. I can’t wait for a trip down memory lane through One-Eyed Willy’s caverns, to introduce my kids to Sloth, and relive what it felt like to grab my bike and roam. I think my kids will seriously thank me, and then they’ll do the truffle shuffle. What could be better?

A perfectly cautionary tale about how amazing childhood can be, it’s Big. Tom Hanks plays Josh Baskin, a kid-turned-adult who wishes upon Zoltar to grow up overnight. It’s funny, nostalgic, and thoughtful, the perfect movie to bridge the gap between generations.

Speaking of generations, the Addams Family has been a source of entertainment for several. Personally, I like the newer versions starring Anjelica Huston & Raul Julia, but even the TV series is iconic. No matter who you identify with, there’s a character for everyone (plus there are real Girl Scouts in the Girl Scout cookies).

If your kids don’t shy from the grim and they’re a little older, The Lost Boys is a Corey Feldman & Corey Haim gem. It’s a creepy take on high school ala vampires and finding where you fit in.

Speaking of fitting in and high school, there is (of course) Can’t Hardly Wait. It’s the quintessential 90’s teen tale about all the different cliques and misfits (because, aren’t we all?). Kids need to know they’re not alone in their weirdness, and this film is a great reminder that’s what makes us unique.

On the subject of misfits, Teen Wolf has to make the list. It’s prime Michael J. Fox, and one of the most quintessential 80’s movies EVER. I mean, what says nostalgia and fun more than Styles’s screen print tees and van surfing?

Now, when I want to prepare the kiddos for college there really is only one true film to do that with: Real Genius. Maybe college isn’t all laser beams and hallways full of ice, but it most definitely can be expanding your mind, young love, and finding out who you are.

Two guys that have always stayed true to themselves are Bill & Ted. Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure AND Bogus Journey are both heartwarming, creative films that span across time. There’s a lot of history, a little bit of mystery, and some rocking music. Plus, the third B & T (Bill & Ted Face the Music) is set to come out in a few years, which means I have to premiere the first two before the third hits theaters. That way the kiddos can be just as excited as me!

Of course, if we are talking time travel, I’d be remiss if I didn’t share Back to the Future I, II, & III with my kiddos. The storylines are all so different, yet each one has a theme of love and family running through it. It seems only right that I introduce the kiddos to the McFlys.

What movies are at the top of your sharing list?? #sponsored #dvdnation #movielover

Movies are Magical

Films have the ability to take people on journeys without even pulling them from the comfort of their couches. They helped me escape the difficulties of childhood, and now a taxing adulthood.

But the more magical thing about movies is that they remain to be so much to so many people. I was just taken on a lovely trip through Southern California, a film lovers’ highlight reel of the area, courtesy of DVD.com. As a highest-tier member of their ambassador program, I was eligible for this amazing, eye-opening experience.

We started with a visit to Mickey’s Not-So-Scary Halloween party and lived every Disney lovers’ fantasy by closing out the park stuffed full of free candy and dressed in our favorite paraphernalia.

The next day we woke up bright and early and headed to the nearest DVD Netflix hub. When we arrived we were greeted with warm and friendly employees who walked us through the entire warehouse. Their enthusiasm was contagious, even though it was extremely early. We may not have been accustomed to being awake at that time, but they had been up and hauling DVDs for hours already. That’s how they do it in order to get your movies to your house on time. Thank you, DVD Netflix!

This is what 300k movies looks like
Beautiful machinery

After that we were treated to a writing session with the incredible David Raether. He gave us some pointers on having maximum impact in our pieces, and I left with a lot more writing confidence.

After a lovely lunch at the hotel, we launched ourselves to the next stop, which was the Warner Brothers’ Studios in Burbank. There we went on an absolutely delightful Classics Tour.

And after all was said and done, my biggest takeaway – besides a once-in-a-lifetime experience – was that movies unite people. No matter movies’ genres, themes, top-billed actresses, etc, films bring millions of people together.

On this trip, I was introduced to Linda, a creator with a passion for film so great, she watches them all. Her zest is contagious, and I can’t wait to read through all of her past articles to find my next favorite films. I also met Ann, another DVD Netflix Director in their DVD Nation. She loves films with strong female characters and all of the same favorite actresses as me. Then there was Bean, Illinois-based travel and movie blogger infamous for her exciting travel-centric posts that give me a mean case of wanderlust. I’ve admired her articles from afar, but she’s somehow even better in person. Joules was a hilarious Mama who has a fresh voice and fun taste in films that made me want to watch whatever she is watching. And last but undoubtedly not least, there was Raquel, whose knowledge of film (especially the classics) is quite literally awe-inspiring. No matter our opinions of the movies we discussed, we bonded over our mutual interest and how films make us feel. That’s what movies are about. 

At the WB Studios, I was introduced to the story of four studio executive brothers who believed in themselves and realized a dream. I watched the grips and prop handlers lug the necessities from soundstage to soundstage. There were the carpenters in the lumberyard building pieces of sets. There are actresses and actors on the closed sets who bring a story to life, along with the director that sees a vision and makes it happen. The producers, writers, editors, marketers. They’re all a part of these films. They all do it for that same love. That’s what movies are about.

from Small Soldiers
Props building area
Welcome to the Prophouse

Beetlejuice models from the film

And I would be absolutely remiss if I did not mention Michael and his crew at the Anaheim hub (again). They are the people who are at work at 2:30 in the morning, sorting through the DVDs you’ve sent back in, the men and women who fix the machines that sort the new movies you request to your door. The ones who have made it their job to keep you entertained and work through the wee hours to ensure they do. That’s what DVD Netflix is about.

And finally, there’s you. Getting cozy on the couch, being immersed in a new perspective, someone else’s tale. You’ve now joined in. And perhaps your spouse, who’s fallen asleep halfway through and may even have a different opinion that you, they’ve joined in, too. All of you are a part of that film. Forever. That’s the true magic of film. And this is what movies are all about. Uniting people.

Thank you, DVD Netflix, for reminding me over and over again of why I love movies so damn much, and for letting me play a role in it all.

#DVDNation #ad

Lessons From Mom

As performed in the live show Expressing Motherhood in May and June of 2018

There are things our parents choose to do that stay with us forever. These actions, good or bad, teach us the lessons we carry into adulthood and especially parenthood.

Like the time my older brother found a wallet filled to the brim with cash. I was four and he was seven, but as children of a single mother in the eighties, we already knew the value of a dollar; Mom was never one to shelter us from our reality. I remember my brother handing her the leather square in the narrow aisles of a pharmacy. Mom had just tearfully admitted to the clerk she had only enough money for one antibiotic regimen, but two sick children. After she grew a bit sharp with her tongue, as she sometimes did, she was given back the prescription slip and turned away. Only moments later the Universe delivered her a wallet full of money.

I remember Mom looking around, then stuffing it deep underneath her arm in one swift movement. When we arrived home, she unearthed it from her purse, then began counting out the bills onto our hand-me-down coffee table. When she finished at just over a thousand dollars, she pulled out the Driver’s License within the plastic protectant and picked up the phone beside her. We waited with baited breath, unsure of what her next move would be.

“Operator? Yes. Can I please be connected with a ———– from Studio City?”

Moments later she was chatting with a very worried man who wanted to know the whereabouts of his wallet and missing mortgage payment. She offered him her work address and told him to pick it up the next day, but not before confirming how much dough he expected to be returned to him.

When she had replaced the receiver in its plastic cradle, my brother asked, “Why didn’t you return the wallet to the pharmacy if you weren’t going to take any of the money yourself?” To which she replied, “I don’t know if they would have returned it with everything inside. But, I knew I would. I don’t take what’s not mine, because that would be assuming we need it more.”

And at a very young age of four, I learned what my mom’s credo was: honesty must come before anything, including my own needs.

Speaking of Mom’s honesty, I’ll admit it wasn’t always my favorite. She had little filter, and people were often made uncomfortable by her. For example, she once wrote a letter that would be read to my entire sorority at a graduation-related event, which she knew when set out to write it. Despite this, she described in the note how I matured early, as well as that by the age of five, was already concerned whether I’d “get my period by college or not.” See? You’re uncomfortable. So, yeah, I didn’t always enjoy her openness.

But if Mom’s actions taught me anything it’s that the world needs honesty, even if people have trouble digesting it. There was the time she beat me to picking up the phone, and Corey Feldman was on the other line. At the age of seventeen I began running his website, and over the next four years would help him a great deal with local appearances. But, in this moment, he was my boss, and Mom was my very uncool parent who I obviously still lived with.

When Mom realized the gruff voice on the other end belonged to Corey, she was thrilled. She cooed,”Hey Corey! We actually just finished watching one of your films.” She hit the speaker phone and winked at me playfully.

“Oh, yeah?” he replied. “Which one?”

“Amy? What was it called?” Meanwhile, I have turned a ripe shade of red and was silently begging for the phone. But I whisper my reply nonetheless, “Edge of Honor.” She repeats me, and for a moment things seem O.K. because, hey, she hasn’t embarrassed me. It’s a miracle! Then she concludes, “You looked really drugged out in it.”

My heart fell into my stomach, and I instantly tasted bile. I held my breath as my recently exciting social life flashed before my eyes.

Corey waited a few beats. Finally, he replied, “Well, that’s because I was.” And with that, the floodgate opened. He talked about his difficult childhood and former addictions, and Mom listened. Just before Mom finally disengaged the speaker and handed me the phone, Corey asked her to attend an anniversary screening of The Goonies as his date. Much of the cast would be there, and he was inviting her to sit with them.

And, in all my years as one of Corey’s assistants, this would be the most Corey ever opened up. Thus, driving home Mom’s point that transparency is the most healing policy.

Mom’s emphasis on honesty was the most recurring lesson I ever received from her, and I suppose it is what led me to this point. To being a mother that strives to create children who are fair and thoughtful. And to pursuing a career that is intended to inspire mental health and a more accepting world. But, every parent leaves their children with indelible memories that turn into life lessons.

Maybe my children will be up here in a few decades talking about me, and with any luck, it’ll be positive. Maybe your children will be up here narrating what you did with your time as a parent. What will our actions teach our children? I wonder what sort of world they will create together with these lessons.”

To listen to this via Podcast, click here, but please pardon my opening night jitters.

The Nine Best Michael Keaton Movies

Michael Keaton is undoubtedly one of Hollywood’s most unsung gems. His performances are always thoughtful and provocative, whether he’s donning a mask or some oven mitts. In honor of the thirtieth anniversary of one of our very favorite Keaton roles, I’ve compiled a list of my Top 9 Favorite Michael Keaton movies.

9. Keaton’s title character in Johnny Dangerously is the quintessential good guy-turned-bad. After his dear mom falls ill, Johnny is forced into a life of crime to support his little family. The film and Keaton’s charming antics are perfectly paired with the glamour of the 1930’s. If you’ve never seen this on-point parody, be sure to add it to your queue now!


Rent Johnny Dangerously
9. The fascinating true story of the man who brought McDonald’s to franchise fame, Ray Kroc (played by Keaton), is the basis of 2016’s The Founder. From struggling salesman to fast food mogul, Kroc uses his shrewd ambition to transform the McDonald’s brothers’ idea of quick, friendly service. The Founder is a truly fascinating movie from start to finish. Just try to watch it without craving some fries.

Rent The Founder

7. In terms of romcoms, Speechless is one of the best. It’s the hilarious love story of witty, insomniac writers who are working on rival political campaigns. One Democrat, one Republican, and lots of laughs (and did we mention, Geena Davis?). You’ll be sure to fall in love with this film faster than you can say its title.

Rent Speechless
6. Minions’ star-studded cast offers the perfect origin story for Gru’s delightful cronies. Keaton plays Walter Nelson, the dastardly dad of the bank-robbing family that allows Kevin and friends to hitch a ride to the Villain Convention. Thanks, Pops! If it weren’t for you, we wouldn’t have met the totally killer Scarlet Overkill.

Rent Minions
5. Not many movies can beat Multiplicity in terms of Keaton roles, if not because there’s an infinite number of him! Keaton plays Doug Kinney, overwhelmed family man and construction worker. After he takes part in an experiment in cloning, he’s given the gift of a second pair of hands. But, it isn’t long before things go haywire (and that’s when the real fun starts).

Rent Multiplicity

4. Quentin Tarantino’s Jackie Brown is a crime thriller that will have you riveted from beginning to end. Jackie, played by the incomparable Pam Grier, is an airline agent who’s resorted to smuggling drugs to help make ends meet. Ray Nicolette (Keaton) is the ATF agent who plans to take her down. Be sure to add it to your queue this evening if you’re craving some star-studded action.

Rent Jackie Brown

3. If any movie remains to be an anthem to eighties parenting, it’s Mr. Mom. Keaton plays a down on his luck dad that’s just lost his job, and becomes a stay-at-home parent. Keaton might not handle his new position with grace, but he sure does with humor. Thanks, Michael, for this lovely reminder why Parenthood is absolutely no joke.

Rent Mr. Mom

2. There’s a reason why Tim Burton’s Batman spawned a trend in super hero movie-making. It’s dark, wicked, and Keaton’s portrayal of Bruce Wayne and his alter ego is without a doubt, my favorite ever. Plus, his counterpart (Jack Nicholson’s Joker) has to be the best adversary, too. There’s no going wrong with this rendition of a classic.

Rent Batman
1. Even though it’s celebrating its thirtieth anniversary this year, Beetlejuice remains to be our favorite Keaton film of all time (which, as you can tell by its counterparts, is a big deal). One can hardly tell the rude dead dude with the ‘tude is Michael. He makes for the perfect meddling spirit, supplying freshly dead newlyweds (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) with a haunting that is sure to scare away their new, very much alive, roommates. Apparently, Burton and Keaton make for a magical pair.

Rent Beetlejuice

Thanks to DVD Netflix for all the killer rental options & for allowing me to be a Director in the #DVDNation 🤘🏻