An Open Letter *From* My Deceased Mother

Not long ago I shared an open letter I wrote to my deceased mother. And as my latest Expressing Motherhood piece mentioned an open letter she wrote me that was read at a graduation-related event, I thought that it would be fitting this year (on her death date) to share it.

‘Dear Amy,

When you arrived on December 24th, 21 years ago, I knew you would be destined for greatness!

The doctor said, “It’s a girl, but she’s only 4 lbs and 16 1/2 inches!”

My mother said, “I cook chickens for dinner that are bigger than that!”

I said, “Her entire head fits in the palm of my hand!”

Yes, Amy, you were small, but as people say, “The best things come in small packages!”

We brought you home ten days later, nameless. I searched high and low for a name that would best suit you, to no avail. Until your brother Jesse came to the rescue and said, “I think we should call her Amy.” And so it was, you were named Amy.

Once you had the first name of Amy, how more befitting would it have been, but for me to call you ‘Amy Beth.’ And so it came to be, your name was once and for all, decided by a joint venture of your brother and me.

Now, being that you came early, a month early, that should have been a sign. Unfortunately, I was not in tune with human nature then, as I am now. But had I been, I would have known some things about you early on. As things go, not only did you mature emotionally, psychologically, and intellectually early, but also physically!

[ūüôĄūüėĎūüėĖ]

I remember driving in the car one day, when you were only 5 years old, and you saying to me, “Mom, will I have my period by the time I’m in college?”

Then your brother turned to you and said, “Amy, don’t worry, you’ll get it way, way, way before then.” And he was right.

Yes, you were early at that too. And yes you did get it before you started college. Way, way, way before you started college!

[Thanks, Mom ūüėĎ]

But now, as you are nearing the end of college, I must say, the things you have accomplished have definitely been filled with greatness! And I am very proud to be your mom!

Love forever and always,

Mom’

…. So, now you know. I got my blatant honesty and penchant for over-sharing from my Mama. And I’ll probably never stop, because it’s how I keep her spirit alive.

RIP Mom ūüíď

1/26/1952 – 9/25/2007

Love You Forever

“The tie which links mother and child is of such pure and immaculate strength as to be never violated.”

~Washington Irving

As seen in Chicken Soup for the Soul: Messages from Heaven & Chicken Soup for the Soul: For Mom, With Love

No one is ever ready to say goodbye to a parent, and I was no exception. When my mother suddenly passed away at the age of fifty-five, it was devastating. The only way I knew how to cope was to write. When it came time to write her eulogy, I welcomed the chance to honor her.

After reading the eulogy at her funeral, I folded it neatly and tucked it between the pages of her favorite children’s book, Love You Forever. When it was time to pay final homage to her, I felt satisfied as I placed my only copy of the book in her arms and helped to lower her casket.

Shortly thereafter though, I broke down. I could think of nothing but my mother. I missed her with every cell in my body. But most overwhelmingly, I could no longer grasp the concept of where she had gone. I found it impossible to believe that she was watching over me. If she were, I thought, then she would surely make her presence known. I pleaded with the Heavens to show me she was there, that she was still sending her love, and keeping a watchful eye. No such luck.

Weeks went by. I became depressed and broken, unable to fulfill simple tasks and care for myself. I stayed home. People came in and out, checking on me at all hours of the day. Family and friends tried to coax me out of the house, but all I wanted to do was hide. I wanted to hide from my harsh reality: I would never see or hear from my mother again. Finally, those who cared about me had had enough.

One night, my best friend and her partner came over with a plan to get me out of the house. I debated with them for over an hour, pleading for them to leave me alone. Two hours and a million excuses later, we finally compromised and I allowed them to take me on a quick trip to Target.

As we walked through the aisles my feet dragged. I didn’t want to be there. I didn’t want to be anywhere. Nonetheless, we perused the make-up, electronics, and home goods aisles. They were there to offer me an outlet, and I was only there to placate them. After several more minutes of mindless meandering I was done. I told them I had to go back home, that I needed to get out of there.

“Alright, but first we have to stop by the candy section. A little sugar will give you a pick-me-up,‚ÄĚ they reasoned.

I swallowed my pain and continued. I picked out a piece of candy just to avoid my friends’ concerned stares. At the checkout, we dropped our items on the conveyor belt and waited in line. I looked at the merchandise arrayed at the checkout. At the top of a shelf, on top of the candy, hair ties, and hand sanitizer, sat a book, a copy of Love You Forever! I snatched the copy and skimmed the pages, enjoying the pictures of a mother cradling her child. Tears welled in my eyes.

“Ma‚Äôam? Ma‚Äôam? How would you like to pay for this?‚ÄĚ the cashier asked.

I snapped back to reality, but ignored her question. ‚ÄúWhy is this book here?‚ÄĚ I demanded to know.

“I‚Äôm not sure, ma‚Äôam. Maybe someone was planning to buy it but chose not to in the end? They were probably just too lazy to put it back… It happens all the time, unfortunately. Thanks for pointing it out.‚ÄĚ

I felt compelled to know more, and am still not sure why I asked my next question.

“Where are the rest of the copies of this book?‚ÄĚ

“Wow. You sure love that book. The rest are probably in our book section, but I‚Äôll scan it just to make sure. Sometimes when a book is on promotion it is moved.‚ÄĚ

She scanned it. The machine made a few loud, shrill beeps.

“Huh. That‚Äôs weird. It‚Äôs not scanning. Let me see…‚ÄĚ

The few moments I waited felt like eternity. A ball of excitement mixed with anxiety formed in my stomach.

“I‚Äôm sorry, ma‚Äôam. This book isn‚Äôt scanning. In fact, I dont even think it’s from our store. I‚Äôm not really sure why it was sitting there… If you‚Äôd like to buy it ma‚Äôam, I apologize because I guess it‚Äôs not really available for purchase. But… I mean… I guess you can… Just take it? It‚Äôs not really ours to sell.‚ÄĚ

My heart fluttered as I gingerly took back the book. I cradled it in my arms and as I did, I felt a sense of security envelop me. I knew this was a message from my mother. It was a message of love, support, and understanding.

It was her way of saying, ‚ÄúI will love you forever, no matter what.‚ÄĚ And I‚Äôve never doubted that since.

~A.B. Chesler

To All the Friends I’ve Lost Along the Way

I have lost many friends over the years. A few were stolen by Death (may they rest in peace), but far more of them I have lost to life.

Some of those losses have been easy; a simple cease of communication was enough to loosen our bonds. Other endings have been sloppy & painful, leaving both parties scorned. Some are intentional, others unintentional. But the common thread among all of them is that they have been necessary.

See, I believe everyone comes into your life for a reason, but not everyone stays. Those exits happen for a reason, too. We cannot expect to be able to keep everyone. We are dynamic, as are what we need and what we want. Our relationships must ebb and flow, too.

So, to those friends who I have moved on from, or that have moved on from me, I wish you the best of luck in life. My absence does not mean I am wishing you ill will; on the contrary, I hope you are soaring. I hope whatever may have caused the gash between us to have healed when your wounds were less fresh. For, it’s true: we cannot find a place for everyone in our lives. But, we can always find a place to wish them well.

Nine Years Later

When I was pregnant with Charlotte someone in the Starbucks line¬†imparted a piece of wisdom to me. This is a frequent occurrence during pregnancy – advice, words of wisdom, warnings, congratulations – strangers offer them all.¬†¬†Few are gems, but¬†for some reason this woman’s words still echo through my mind to this day,¬†four years later. Perhaps it was¬†the fact that she was toting two little ones, her hair was¬†askew, and her smile was both¬†defeated¬†and effervescent¬†at the same time. It’s possible that I recognized a future soul sister in her. It could be¬†that¬†I was¬†hungry for guidance and support. Whatever the reason, I listened.¬†And even though I often forget what I’m saying mid-sentence,¬†or even more frequently¬†return from the grocery store¬†with half the things I need and double the things I want, this phrase embedded itself in my brain. Presumably forever.

“The days are long, but the years are short,” she had¬†said kindly yet frankly. I committed the line to memory as we¬†continued to banter¬†light-heartedly. As I mentioned, I¬†will have had¬†hundreds of run-ins with people by the end of both of my pregnancies. But, this one. This one clearly felt different.

Eventually, as those first months of sleep deprivation and¬†hormonal rollercoaster rides melted away, and I dug myself out of the trench that is the transition¬†from pregnancy to postpartum, life¬†went on. At¬†both a snail’s pace and¬†break neck speed.¬†My¬†days often¬†felt¬†undeniably (and oddly) long AND¬†short; I spent them¬†mourning the loss of the family I grew up with, no matter how dysfunctional it may have been, while trying to balance the creation of a new one. I was happy and sad. And then I¬†was pregnant again. Charlotte soon¬†turned two. Adam arrived. My daughter started school. She was quickly out of diapers, and¬†he was sitting up. The next thing I know my kids are three and a half and eight months, and my heart has octupled in size.

And within the¬†proverbial blink of an eye, the¬†tragic calendar count I have¬†been¬†conducting amidst all¬†of¬†life’s curveballs¬†gets much closer to¬†a decade¬†than to any other convenient measure of time. Nine years to be exact. Nine years since Mom was killed. If you had asked me to write about my life that day in Starbucks four years ago, my reflection¬†would have been much different. I was so fractured¬†then. Despite having found love, buying a home,¬†working steadily, and being pregnant, I was slogged down by sadness. I was in the deepest pit of grief still, attempting to crawl my way out.¬†My stance was¬†that¬†the woman who had given me life, only to have hers selfishly¬†taken away, was missing out on all these events that she had begun dreaming of the moment I¬†was born. It felt so wrong to rejoice without her. So, as my life continued on an uptrend, as did the difficulty of moving on.

But now, as we approach this ninth “anniversary” of Mom’s death,¬†it¬†is clear to me¬†that this extra¬†time passed¬†has helped to heal a good deal¬†of my wounds, and that my frame of mind is evolving.¬†It is true that some¬†days I still spend a little sadder than others. I catch myself standing at the edge of the gaping hole that grief always leaves behind in its wake, teetering between the me that is¬†present in all¬†my current¬†love and¬†slipping back into the¬†me that is rooted¬†in my painful past. But what¬†also remains true, and¬†what I often remind myself of,¬†is that I have lived¬†nine whole years since Mom died. Within those nine years¬†I met the love of my life. A stubborn, handsome, funny, incredibly loving, supportive, relentless, nutty man whom Mom would have loved. We moved a bunch of times,¬†sold a home, bought¬†one. We planned our dream wedding. We honeymooned. We made babies that we¬†adore more than life itself. We live our lives every day, not loving every moment, but valuing each one. We have done all these things, and despite the¬†sadness I felt amidst many of them, I¬†often look back with so much¬†fondness. These are the highlights of my life. They would have been the highlights of my mother’s as well. She would never want my happiest recollections to be so tainted.

Thus, if my grief, heartbreak and *parenthood* have taught me anything, it’s that every moment matters.¬†So, as I begin this tenth year without my mom, I¬†choose to reflect on that wise¬†saying a nice lady in¬†Starbucks¬†once shared with me. “The days are long, but¬†the years are short.”¬†Why should I¬†waste¬†these precious minutes scarred and jaded,¬†when they¬†will so rapidly weave together to create the fabric of my whole lifetime?¬†This¬†annual commemoration ¬†(also conveniently always “celebrated” around Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur), I vow to try my best to be content in every beautiful, poop, tear, and¬†laughter-filled moment I’m gifted with. Because before I¬†know it,¬†the days of my¬†live will morph into¬†years. And I’m planning¬†on filling mine with more than enough¬†happiness¬†for both Mom and me.

 

 

“House of Love”

At birth I was given the name Amy Beth. My mother would tell me from there on out that it translated to “House of Love.” It’s true; loosely translated, and in two different languages, it means something like that.¬†But what I honestly think is¬†most important about my name is its intended meaning.

My mother grew up in a household that was filled with anything but warmth and love. I know my grandparents, passionate Israelis who had made their way to The Valley in hopes of a better life, fought quite a bit. Mom grew used to tumult, so when she met my Dad his alcoholic and lothario tendencies were not as much of a deterrent as they should have been. And, by the time I was born, my parents were divorced. I was born into a broken home rather than a House of Love.

The small,¬†dysfunctional¬†family I grew up in bred mistrust. When it disbanded in¬†2007, I was left with a choice. Do I continue down the path of isolation because I don’t trust people, or do I make decisions that allow me to learn to trust and unconditionally love others (as well as myself)? At this exact time¬†I can clearly¬†remember hating my name. It seemed to mock me. I was bitter¬†for that and so much more.

But as time went on, and I learned what true love was, I realized that by dubbing me “House of Love,”¬†Mom¬†shared with me¬†the one wish she had always held so dearly in her heart: that I be given a home filled with unconditional love. And by something like the self-fulfilling prophecy (and making the choice to be happy), I have realized that my biggest goal in life is to break the chain of tumult and mistrust. I deserve better, and so does my family. I will wear my name proudly as a badge of courage to break the chain of abuse.