This is 5.

Today began like any other day. We spent far too much time looking for our shoes, even though I remind both kids to use the under-the-stairs cubbies each time they take them off. We argued over what shirt would be worn in order to be warm enough in this weather. And just when tension was rising, Charlotte turned to me and said, “Mommy, I’m going to make you a card.”

My face lit up, thinking perhaps my recent lessons about starting with kindness may be working. Then she continues, “How do I spell, ‘I don’t love you?’”

Edward Bulwer-Lytton was right. Words have the potential to do much greater harm than weapons. Such a simple sentence, yet it cut straight to the heart. My first inclination was to be hurt and sad. I told her so, and I saw her face drop even more, which was not my intention either. She had wanted to hurt me, sure, but she hadn’t really understood the levity of her chosen words.

And that soon became today’s biggest slap in the face. Not that she was hurt enough to say those words, because she really hadn’t been, but that I have a child old enough to even want to formulate a proverbial slap in the face.

I officially have a big girl on my hands, this I know now. Which, as my initial sense of feeling unloved is over, shocks me. And also saddens me in its own rite. I have been guilty of rushing this parenting thing along from the getgo.

“I can’t wait for them to sleep through the night.”

“I can’t wait for her to be potty trained.”

“Ugh, the moment the paci is gone is the moment I’m free!”

But the busier life remains, the hastier time seems to wane. And parenthood can make even an empty schedule full in an instant. So, there went five years and with that barb, “I don’t love you,” they feel incredibly distant.

I shed a few tears, I’ll admit. She saw me crying. What she didn’t understand that I was no longer really hurt, just grieving her babyhood.

So, I chose to be open with her. I told her she hurt me, and saying that sort of thing wasn’t OK. But, that wasn’t really why I was crying. I told her that she is my daughter forever and I am her mommy for just about double that. And that it was already going by in the blink of an eye.

She hugged me. We made up, and by the time I dropped her off at school we were belting an MJ duet at the top of our lungs. I realized that this snarkiness may be 5, but that 6 will be here before I know it. And although time does not discriminate the speed at which it seems to progress, it does give us the gift of retrospection and introspection. And a lot of make-up hugs.

What is Mom2Summit and Why Did I Go?

Over the last couple weeks my social media accounts may have made you ask “what the heck is #Mom2Summit and why does Amy care so much about it?”

And to be brutally frank, before this weekend, I’m not sure I could have answered that question with confidence. As a first-time attendee, I would have offered “it’s a convention designed for moms that blog. We attend classes that promote professional development, and amidst all of them, we also have parties and fun. Oh, and brands join us, too, so we can help spread the word of how great they are. Did I forget to mention I get to leave my familial duties for three days and I don’t have to make ONE DAMN MEAL that entire time?”

The lovely Lucy of Life of Mom & I arrive!

 

But, as soon as we arrived at the Langham Pasadena I knew it was so much more than that.

Before I get into how I knew, let me be real: as a native of LA, born, bred, and breeding only a mile or two from where I grew up, it’s hard to create a village. I am a relatively young mother for our area, which means my village has consisted of mostly childless friends. But motherhood, especially early motherhood, can be difficult and isolating. Even moreso when your circle doesn’t quite understand the stages of your struggle. Doubly so when you’ve no longer have your own mother for guidance or support.

However, when I arrived at Mom2, it became instantly apparent that it is much more than just a convention. It is that village I’ve been seeking.

The inclusiveness Mom 2.0 Summit promotes is what makes the difference. Upon entering the event space, you will be greeted with warm hellos,  whether you know people or not. And if you don’t, it won’t be long before you find your crew. See a Mom Blog celeb you adore? This is the place to introduce yourself.  I made friends in bathroom lines, in sessions, on the dance floor, and even within our hotel room. And it was in all of these places that I found a community filled with support, love, and understanding.

This may seem trivial, but in a world where success is so often viewed as finite, it is comforting to find a space filled with women that build each other up. It is clear that the people that attend Mom2Summit realize it is their arena to create lasting connections, and not just with the big brands that can further their mission.

People are at the heart of the convention. Its mission is to enrich the professional and personal lives of its participants, that much remains clear.

Of course the programming is helpful, to say the least. The keynotes were uplifting and inspiring. I now feel like an IG pro thanks to last year’s Iris Award winner of Instagram of the Year, (and this year’s Best Photographer), Lashawn Wiltz. I’m ready to pitch producers segments for television shows courtesy of Orly Shani and Home and Family. I am even prepared to pitch a TEDx Talk topic because of Lori Granito’s informative how-to session.

Also, yes, the events are over-the-top fabulous. I mean, how many times can you say you jumped into a ball pit supplied by Stitch Fix, got a makeover courtesy of Dove, took headshots courtesy of Best Buy, or schmoozed with Taye Diggs?


But, like I said, at the heart of this remains to be the Mom2Community. A community I am beyond proud to have joined this weekend, and will continue to attempt to enrich year after year. See ya in Austin next, Mamas! 💓💓